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BINGHAMTON UNIVERSITY-LED ENERGY INITIATIVE WINS MILLIONS IN NSF ENGINES COMPETITION


Binghamton University professor M. Stanley Whittingham (left), chief innovation officer of Binghamton–led Upstate New York Energy Storage Engine and Nobel Laureate recipient, appears with U.S. Senate Majority Leader Charles Schumer (D–N.Y.) following Schumer’s Monday announcement that Upstate New York Energy Storage Engine has won millions in federal funding in the U.S. National Science Foundation’s regional “Innovation Engines” competition. (Photo credit: Office of U.S. Senate Majority Leader Charles Schumer)


VESTAL, N.Y. — Binghamton University–led Upstate New York Energy Storage Engine has won millions in federal funding in the U.S. National Science Foundation’s regional “Innovation Engines” (NSF Engines) competition.


The Binghamton–led project was one of only 10 projects across the country selected for the award, the office of U.S. Senate Majority Leader Charles Schumer (D–N.Y.) announced on Monday.


Upstate New York Energy Storage Engine is led by Binghamton University and its New Energy New York (NENY) coalition of partners, per the NENY website.


The coalition includes entities in 27 counties in upstate New York., including Cornell University, Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT), and Syracuse University, for efforts in research and development, as well as New York Battery and Energy Storage Technology Consortium (NY-BEST), Launch NY, and multiple private-sector partners to “ensure effective industry-informed projects,” Schumer’s office said.


The win will mean $15 million in federal funding immediately, with up to $160 million total over the life of the program, from the NSF to spur growth and research in battery development and manufacturing in upstate New York over the next decade.


NSF Engines was created by the majority leader’s CHIPS & Science Law, his office noted.


“Up to $160 million is now on its way to supercharge Upstate NY as a booming battery research hub being led by Binghamton University,” Schumer said in a news release. “Thanks to my CHIPS & Science Law, Binghamton will be the beating electric heart of federal efforts to help bring battery innovation and development back from overseas to spark growth of this critical industry vital to our nation’s national and economic security. With the prestigious NSF Engines award, the Southern Tier and Upstate NY has officially secured its place as the next loop on America’s battery belt.”


Schumer made the announcement during a Monday appearance at Binghamton University.


Binghamton University’s NSF Regional Engines proposal will capitalize on efforts already underway and “synergize” existing resources to launch new initiatives focused on strengthening the battery supply chain, accelerating the transfer of battery technologies from lab to market, and mobilizing resources around research and development to complement battery-manufacturing initiatives and growing cross-sector partnerships per the release.


“Establishing a battery and energy storage Engine here in upstate New York is a crucial step to bringing domestic production of batteries and a secure supply chain to the U.S.,” M. Stanley Whittingham, Engine chief innovation officer, Binghamton University professor, and Nobel Laureate recipient, said. “It is critically important that battery innovations stemming from university and industry researchers can be developed, prototyped and manufactured in the U.S. in order to leap frog today’s Asian technology. With Senator Schumer’s continued support, we are confident we can transform our region, attract investment, create new jobs and fill those jobs with a skilled workforce.”


Schumer’s office noted that the Monday funding award follows the more than $113 million announced in 2022 for Binghamton to establish its battery manufacturing and innovation hub. He also secured the federal Tech Hub designation for the Southern Tier late last year.


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